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Four Easy Delegation Strategies

Posted By APSO, 08 September 2015

Four Easy Delegation Strategies


About the Author: Bill Radin is one of the most popular and highly regarded trainers in the recruiting industry and trains across the United States.

There’s no substitute for interacting with your candidates and employers in real time. But unfortunately, there are only so many hours in each day. By delegating routine, repetitive or data-oriented tasks, you can save time and in many ways exercise more control than if you were to perform every single function personally.

Here are some tips on how to delegate your tasks. Remember that delegation doesn’t necessarily mean that you give tasks to other people. I’ve found that in many cases, I can use various instruments of delegation to leverage my efforts. Here are a few examples:

  • CV templates. 

Years ago, I used to spend time coaching candidates to help them improve the quality and appearance of their CVs. Today, I ask them to go to my website and study the template of an exemplary resume and revise theirs accordingly. In this case, the template acts as an instrument of delegation, and the exercise spares me a lot of the time I might spend as an editor, not a recruiter. If the candidates can clearly see how to organise their accomplishments, they can re-format their CV and improve their chances of getting hired.

  • Position comparisons. 

If a candidate is unclear about the merits of a new job, you can use itemised lists to help make A-B comparisons with the old job. To compare compensation, I use a simple side-by-side spreadsheet to examine items such as base salary, bonus, deferred compensation, insurance costs, hidden expenses and health care benefits. To compare intangibles, I’ll provide a worksheet to examine the qualitative differences between jobs to help the candidate make an informed decision. By delegating to the worksheets, I can change the candidate’s perception of my role from salesman (“Here’s why you should take the job”) to advisor (“Let’s analyse your situation based on the facts”).

  • Interview prep

You should always custom tailor the way you prepare candidates prior to their interviews. But there are also many standard conventions regarding attire, attitude, punctuality and so forth that you can just as easily give to your candidates in the form of a reading assignment, rather than as a night-before lecture. Delegating the talking points of your interview prep to a brochure or web page saves time and allows you to concentrate on the candidates’ understanding of the position and on any interviewing skills that need the most attention.

  • Applications and navigators. 

Often, you can get better information in a more timely fashion directly from the candidates and hiring managers themselves than you can by an exhaustive interviewing process. By having the employer fill out a questionnaire (which I call an “executive search navigator”) and the candidate fill out an application or bio-survey, I can get routine demographic information in advance, freeing me up to concentrate on the more intangible and subjective aspects of their needs.

One Delegation to Avoid

I know this may sound counter-intuitive, but the one instrument of delegation I never want a candidate to see is the company’s job description. There are three reasons for this: First, most standard-issue job descriptions are so exhaustive with their “must-have” lists that they tend to demoralise candidates who don’t check every single box. Second, most job descriptions are outrageously vague and superficial, and rarely address the issue of “why” the position needs to be filled or “how” the right candidate will help the company solve problems or achieve goals.

Finally, a job description can undermine the recruiter’s value as a matchmaker and interpreter of the company’s unique opportunity relative to the candidate’s true potential. The last thing I want is to find a candidate, establish trust and present a job I feel is a good match, only to have a job description contradict or confuse the narrative. 

Tags:  APSO  Bill Radin  candidate  clients  coaching  delegation  job description  planning  strategy 

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HR Future LITE: Complimentary September 2014 Issue

Posted By APSO, 11 September 2014

HR Future LITE- Complementary September 2014 Issue

To view the September 2014 issue of HR Future LITE, please CLICK HERE or on the cover below. To become an HR Future member and gain access to all the articles in the full version of HR Future (R950 ex VAT for 12 months), email Chantal at chantal@hrfuture.net.

Tags:  age management  APSO  brand  coaching  economics  ethics  HR Future  leaders  legal  opinion  retention  talent development  technology 

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