Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join APSO Now!
Community Search
Talent Magnet
Group HomeGroup Home Blog Home Group Blogs
Aimed at corporate employers, especially those who make use of recruitment and staffing companies. Great articles, advice and issues of general interest to HR managers and others involved in talent recruitment, selection and retention.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: APSO  apsogram  ethics  Recruitment  candidate  CV  Age Management  compliance  legislation  LRA  management  preferred supplier listing  quality  success  candidates  culture  employee  fees  HR Future  innovation  job search  Leadership  organisational culture  placements  regulation  risk  social media  staffing  strategy  technology 

Four Easy Delegation Strategies

Posted By APSO, 08 September 2015

Four Easy Delegation Strategies


About the Author: Bill Radin is one of the most popular and highly regarded trainers in the recruiting industry and trains across the United States.

There’s no substitute for interacting with your candidates and employers in real time. But unfortunately, there are only so many hours in each day. By delegating routine, repetitive or data-oriented tasks, you can save time and in many ways exercise more control than if you were to perform every single function personally.

Here are some tips on how to delegate your tasks. Remember that delegation doesn’t necessarily mean that you give tasks to other people. I’ve found that in many cases, I can use various instruments of delegation to leverage my efforts. Here are a few examples:

  • CV templates. 

Years ago, I used to spend time coaching candidates to help them improve the quality and appearance of their CVs. Today, I ask them to go to my website and study the template of an exemplary resume and revise theirs accordingly. In this case, the template acts as an instrument of delegation, and the exercise spares me a lot of the time I might spend as an editor, not a recruiter. If the candidates can clearly see how to organise their accomplishments, they can re-format their CV and improve their chances of getting hired.

  • Position comparisons. 

If a candidate is unclear about the merits of a new job, you can use itemised lists to help make A-B comparisons with the old job. To compare compensation, I use a simple side-by-side spreadsheet to examine items such as base salary, bonus, deferred compensation, insurance costs, hidden expenses and health care benefits. To compare intangibles, I’ll provide a worksheet to examine the qualitative differences between jobs to help the candidate make an informed decision. By delegating to the worksheets, I can change the candidate’s perception of my role from salesman (“Here’s why you should take the job”) to advisor (“Let’s analyse your situation based on the facts”).

  • Interview prep

You should always custom tailor the way you prepare candidates prior to their interviews. But there are also many standard conventions regarding attire, attitude, punctuality and so forth that you can just as easily give to your candidates in the form of a reading assignment, rather than as a night-before lecture. Delegating the talking points of your interview prep to a brochure or web page saves time and allows you to concentrate on the candidates’ understanding of the position and on any interviewing skills that need the most attention.

  • Applications and navigators. 

Often, you can get better information in a more timely fashion directly from the candidates and hiring managers themselves than you can by an exhaustive interviewing process. By having the employer fill out a questionnaire (which I call an “executive search navigator”) and the candidate fill out an application or bio-survey, I can get routine demographic information in advance, freeing me up to concentrate on the more intangible and subjective aspects of their needs.

One Delegation to Avoid

I know this may sound counter-intuitive, but the one instrument of delegation I never want a candidate to see is the company’s job description. There are three reasons for this: First, most standard-issue job descriptions are so exhaustive with their “must-have” lists that they tend to demoralise candidates who don’t check every single box. Second, most job descriptions are outrageously vague and superficial, and rarely address the issue of “why” the position needs to be filled or “how” the right candidate will help the company solve problems or achieve goals.

Finally, a job description can undermine the recruiter’s value as a matchmaker and interpreter of the company’s unique opportunity relative to the candidate’s true potential. The last thing I want is to find a candidate, establish trust and present a job I feel is a good match, only to have a job description contradict or confuse the narrative. 

Tags:  APSO  Bill Radin  candidate  clients  coaching  delegation  job description  planning  strategy 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Creating Action Plans that Work

Posted By APSO, 19 December 2014
Updated: 04 December 2014

        

In recruitment activity equals results. Contingency based recruitment means that if you’re not careful you can be VERY busy but end up losing money as you chase down “placements”’ that have no chance of actually coming off. Having clear action plans are critical to focusing your efforts and working towards measurable results.



Step 1: Know where you want to be

All great leaders understand that if you don’t know where you’re going you could end up anywhere. Do you have a clear focus of what kind of recruitment you want to practice? The kind of clients and candidates you want to service? If not, now is the time to reassess and make some clear decisions.

Step 2: Be specific

Not only must your goal be specific, but you must also create a specific intention as well as very specific tasks or steps that will move you toward the completion of that goal. Assess the activities and actions that you need to perform in order to move towards your overall goals.

Step 3: Create measurable milestones

Once you have a clear picture of what you’re out to accomplish, as well as the targets you will need to hit throughout the specific period you’re measuring, the next step is to create measurable milestones. Of course ultimately placements are the key measure of success for recruiters but set up some interim milestones, such as CVs out to clients, interviews set up, etc, to track your progress.

Step 4: Make a list

Create a list and accompanying timeline of specific action items or tasks to complete in order to hit those milestones. Lists are great ways of keeping on track as well as visually reminding yourself of what needs to be done and/or how far you are in the process.

Step 5: Break large tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks. 

Some tasks or milestones may seem more daunting to achieve than others. That’s when it makes sense to break larger tasks down into sub-tasks or steps. For example, “source scarce skills” might be broken down into several sub-tasks, such as, scope task, search LinkedIn, contact network, etc.

Step 6: Assign deadlines

Without specific time frames and deadlines, work will definitely expand to fill the time allotted, and certain tasks may never get completed. An effective “To Do List” has clear timeframes that enable prioritisation and planning.

Step 7: Visualise your Goal

Once you’ve created your action items and set a specific timeline, the next step is to create some type of visual representation of your plan. You might use a flowchart, a Gantt chart, a spreadsheet, or some other type of business tool to accomplish this. This is particularly useful for individuals who better interpret and comprehend information in visual format.

Step 8: Acknowledge your accomplishments

Large tasks can be intimidating and overwhelming. Keep your positivity by acknowledging and recording your accomplishments. Why not utilise a highlighter when “crossing off” tasks on your To Do List that have been completed. Rather than the negative association with a strong black line, the use of coloured highlights helps to positively reinforce the items on the list that are finalised.

Step 9:  Work your plan and don’t stop until it’s complete. 

Once your plan is established take daily action and follow up with any other responsible parties to ensure that everyone is doing their part towards the overall goal. If you’re the only one responsible, set aside time at the beginning and end of each day to review your list and assess whether you’ve achieved the goals you’d hoped.

Step 10: Change the date if you must, but never give up on the goal. 

Occasionally, circumstances or unforeseen events can arise that throw a wrench in your ability to meet deadlines, complete tasks and achieve your goal.  This is especially true in recruitment when your ultimate goal – making placements – is dependent on the actions of at least two other people, the client and the candidate. If this happens, do not get discouraged – revise your plan and continue working to meet targets and move forward.

Tags:  action plans  APSO  apsogram  deadlines  decision making  goals  planning  results 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Membership Software  ::  Legal