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HR Future Lite March 2015 issue

Posted By APSO, 02 April 2015

Complimentary Issue of HR Future Lite March 2015 Issue

In this issue:

  • Role of synchronicity in your success
  • Use segmentation to your advantage
  • Learn like a U232 pilot rather than a AF447 pilot

To download the magazine, please click here or on the magazine cover

  


Tags:  APSO  company transfers  HR analytics  HR Future  leadership  organisational culture  reward management  skills development levies 

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HR Future Lite March 2015 issue

Posted By APSO, 02 April 2015

Complimentary Issue of HR Future Lite March 2015 Issue

In this issue:

  • Role of synchronicity in your success
  • Use segmentation to your advantage
  • Learn like a U232 pilot rather than a AF447 pilot

To download the magazine, please click here or on the magazine cover

 

This post has not been tagged.

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Creating Action Plans that Work

Posted By APSO, 15 December 2014
Updated: 04 December 2014

In recruitment activity equals results. Contingency based recruitment means that if you’re not careful you can be VERY busy but end up losing money as you chase down “placements”’ that have no chance of actually coming off. Having clear action plans are critical to focusing your efforts and working towards measurable results.



Step 1: Know where you want to be

All great leaders understand that if you don’t know where you’re going you could end up anywhere. Do you have a clear focus of what kind of recruitment you want to practice? The kind of clients and candidates you want to service? If not, now is the time to reassess and make some clear decisions.

Step 2: Be specific

Not only must your goal be specific, but you must also create a specific intention as well as very specific tasks or steps that will move you toward the completion of that goal. Assess the activities and actions that you need to perform in order to move towards your overall goals.

Step 3: Create measurable milestones

Once you have a clear picture of what you’re out to accomplish, as well as the targets you will need to hit throughout the specific period you’re measuring, the next step is to create measurable milestones. Of course ultimately placements are the key measure of success for recruiters but set up some interim milestones, such as CVs out to clients, interviews set up, etc, to track your progress.

Step 4: Make a list

Create a list and accompanying timeline of specific action items or tasks to complete in order to hit those milestones. Lists are great ways of keeping on track as well as visually reminding yourself of what needs to be done and/or how far you are in the process.


Step 5: Break large tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks. 

Some tasks or milestones may seem more daunting to achieve than others. That’s when it makes sense to break larger tasks down into sub-tasks or steps. For example, “source scarce skills” might be broken down into several sub-tasks, such as, scope task, search LinkedIn, contact network, etc.

Step 6: Assign deadlines

Without specific time frames and deadlines, work will definitely expand to fill the time allotted, and certain tasks may never get completed. An effective “To Do List” has clear timeframes that enable prioritisation and planning.

Step 7: Visualise your Goal

Once you’ve created your action items and set a specific timeline, the next step is to create some type of visual representation of your plan. You might use a flowchart, a Gantt chart, a spreadsheet, or some other type of business tool to accomplish this. This is particularly useful for individuals who better interpret and comprehend information in visual format.

Step 8: Acknowledge your accomplishments

Large tasks can be intimidating and overwhelming. Keep your positivity by acknowledging and recording your accomplishments. Why not utilise a highlighter when “crossing off” tasks on your To Do List that have been completed. Rather than the negative association with a strong black line, the use of coloured highlights helps to positively reinforce the items on the list that are finalised.

Step 9:  Work your plan and don’t stop until it’s complete. 

Once your plan is established take daily action and follow up with any other responsible parties to ensure that everyone is doing their part towards the overall goal. If you’re the only one responsible, set aside time at the beginning and end of each day to review your list and assess whether you’ve achieved the goals you’d hoped.

Step 10: Change the date if you must, but never give up on the goal. 

Occasionally, circumstances or unforeseen events can arise that throw a wrench in your ability to meet deadlines, complete tasks and achieve your goal.  This is especially true in recruitment when your ultimate goal – making placements – is dependent on the actions of at least two other people, the client and the candidate. If this happens, do not get discouraged – revise your plan and continue working to meet targets and move forward.

Tags:  action plans  apso  apsogram  deadlines  decision making  goals  results 

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8 Traits of Successful People

Posted By APSO, 10 December 2014
Updated: 04 December 2014

 

Ten years of research and 500 face-to-face-interviews led Richard St. John, a globe-trotting marathon runner turned motivational speaker, to a collection of eight common traits in successful leaders around the world.

He interviewed individuals from a broad range of backgrounds, businessmen, sports stars, Hollywood greats, Nobel prize winners, academics and others, including Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s, Bill Gates, James Cameron, Matt Groening and even Dan Ackroyd. The list of successful, influential people he interviewed goes on and on.



After analyzing everything he’d learned, he settled on these eight common traits:

1.       Passion. Love what you do.

2.       Work. Really hard.

3.       Focus. On one thing, not everything.

4.       Push. And keep on pushing yourself.

5.       Ideas. Come up with good ones.

6.       Improve. Keep improving yourself and what you do.

7.       Serve. Serve others something of value.

8.       Persist. Because there is no overnight success.

Whilst there are many technical skills that will be needed to drive your career forward, without exception every successful person Richard interviewed believed that without the “8 to be great” traits above, they would never have reached their goals. 

Tags:  APSO  apsogram  focus  ideas  passion  persistence  success 

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HR Future LITE: Complimentary November 2014 Issue

Posted By APSO, 26 November 2014

Herewith the complimentary digital edition of the November 2014 issue of “HR Future LITE”

 

To view the November 2014 issue of HR Future LITE, please CLICK HERE or on the cover below. To become an HR Future member and gain access to all the articles in the complete version of HR Future (R950 ex VAT for 12 months), email Chantal at chantal@hrfuture.net.

 

Tags:  Age management  APSO  ethics  HR technology  Leadership  qualifications  SME  Stress management 

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Agility: The number 1 trait of Future Leaders

Posted By APSO, 10 November 2014

Agility: The number 1 trait of Future Leaders


Over the past decade or even just the last five years, managers have worked in an almost constant state of change. We have witnessed the continued march of globalisation and rapid pace of technological development. Virtual teams made up of globally dispersed members now communicate in real time via multiple channels, sharing data, information and ideas via the cloud. Major social and demographic changes have been taking place with the Baby Boomers starting to relinquish power to the Millennials, the oldest of which are now in their 30s. As we progress through 2014, we hope to fully emerge from the shadows of the 2008 financial crisis but there is still a degree of economic uncertainty ahead.


 

 

 


Through their online community members and a survey of more than 1000 managers, ILM concludes that the 2020 Manager will need to be agile and adaptive but also that the fundamentals of good leadership and management will matter more than ever. It should be noted that should be noted that flexible working, identified as one of the key trends, has a correlation with some of the other trends highlighted. It is a driver for increasing importance placed on relationship-building and one of the reasons why managers will face more complex challenges over the coming years when it comes to performing core management functions.


Flexible Workforce gather momentum

Unsurprisingly, the growing trend is driven by improvements in IT and data transfer speeds. It isn’t only about technology though. Organisations are increasingly recognising the benefits of working more flexibly for the benefit of consumers and their staff. Flexible working provides an additional and highly effective incentive to attract and retain talented employees. It will be expected by the Millennials who are becoming an increasing part of the workforce although flexible working is popular with older workers too. By giving individuals greater control over their working day, they also feel more empowered and this can lead to increased engagement and productivity levels. When implemented correctly, flexible working can also reduce office overheads.


Better Together

The research revealed that working relationships are increasingly important both within teams and with external stakeholders. More than half of managers surveyed recognised this as a future trend and the same percentage though that working relationships were now more important than five years ago. The results underlines that the ability to form and manage working relationships will be central when it comes to leading and managing people in the future. The business of managing such relationships is far more complex that it was: it involves far more than holding a weekly meeting or addressing a room full of people but also projecting a presence via multiple channels as well as being an expert listener. This is as much about emotional intelligence and trust as it is about technical proficiency.


Core Competency required

The core functions of good leadership and management will be more important but harder to achieve. Overall, more than half of managers agreed that skills such as communication, delegating, goal-setting and motivating direct reports were more important but 46% agreed that tasks related to these skills were harder to achieve. Flexible working will continue to impact traditional working patterns and structures. Work is something that can be done anywhere, any time with traditional 9 – 5 parameters being eroded. For many managers there is no clearly defined “end of the day”. Less time due to competition from other priorities, and the growing complexity of structures, processes and systems were cited as reasons why basic management tasks are proving more difficult to perform. The top three areas for development highlighted by respondents include clear communication, effective planning and problem-solving.


Employability vs. Stable Employment

 

The traditional legal and psychological contracts that long existed between employers and employees are changing rapidly. Few buy into this concept of a job for life any more. While this is unpleasant for some, for others it provides opportunity for career progression and to adjust their work/life balance to best suit their personal circumstances.

 

More measured approaches

 

The majority of managers agree that the means of measuring and rewarding performance has changed over the past five years. Increasingly sophisticated performance indicators are possible and there has been growing interest in big data, which some expect to revolutionise a number of areas, including performance management.

 

Know...Do...Be = Future Leader Success

To succeed in the future, managers must be more agile, responsive and able to adapt to the needs of a radically different workplace. They must also continue to contend with further technological and cultural changes that will impact how organisations operate. At the same time, managers must ensure the core management and leadership practices are successfully carried out.


Know

And understand the core functions of leadership and management from planning to vital people skills such as motivation, effective communication and driving engagement. Crucially, the key to being a successful manager will be, knowing how to apply these skills within the change workplace.


Do

With the increase of flexible working, managers must trust their reports and avoid micro-management. Some may struggle if they cannot adjust their style and techniques and learn to measure performance on outcomes rather than hours worked.


Be

Agile and adaptive but also reliable and solid managers. They should be comfortable themselves working flexibly and leading virtual and flexible teams. They should be emotionally intelligent as the qualities that embody this will be required in all aspects of management whether it be engaging and motivating teams or building successful working relationships and partnerships.

 

Extracts from: ILM Research Report “2020 Vision: Future Trends in Leadership & Management”. The full report is available www.i-l-m.com The Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM) is the UK’s largest management development organisation. They are passionate about good leadership and management, and its power to drive organisational performance and wider economic prosperity.

Tags:  Agility  core competency  employability  engagement  future leaders  measurement approaches  stable employment 

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PROFESSION Articles

Posted By APSO, 16 October 2014
Updated: 15 October 2014

These articles are intended to arm job seekers in their quest of finding employment.

To download these insightful articles, please click on the image blow or click here.

 


Tags:  apprenticeship  APSO  experience  get hired  job seeking  learnerships  PROfession  PROfusion  rights  volunteering 

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Boost creativity: Encourage outside-the-box thinking

Posted By APSO, 09 October 2014
Updated: 18 September 2014

Boost creativity: Encourage outside-the-box thinking

The recruitment industry is tough and getting tougher by the day. It’s time to brainstorm and get your thinking cap on. Boost creativity in your business and invest in an afternoon of random thoughts (remember, nothing is too wacky and most of the best ideas start as completely manic!) and open discussion in an attempt to re-invent your business, your services and your value.




Before you can get down to creative thinking, make sure that you eliminate these creativity hurdles:

  •  Heavy workloads
  •  Tight deadlines
  •  Red-tape (business processes)
  •  Managers/Clients who are closed to new ideas
  •  Limited budgets

Provide an environment that encourages entrepreneurial thinking and “different think”. Whilst you don’t have to accept (or implement) every idea that is presented, make sure that you listen to the idea, ask questions and actively consider it to see if it could make a positive difference.

Consider “time to market” in your planning. Rather implement a good idea quickly and see if it works. If it doesn’t, pull it quick and lose nothing. Waiting to see if someone else tries it will only defer your potential advantage but also ensure that you’re always seen as a follower not a trailblazer.

Opportunities for differentiation

Recruitment is recruitment....or is it? The labour market is the same for everyone – same access to clients, candidates and technology. So? How do you differentiate yourself in an otherwise crowded marketplace? Consider...

  •   Different fee models – shift from contingency and traditional % on remuneration
  •   Unbundling your services – think a la carte menu, not one price all you can eat buffet
  •   Partnering with specialists in aligned services, such as HR, psychometrics etc.
  •   Expertise due to specialisation
  •   Individual, not company, focused services, such as payroll management

Employee engagement increases when individuals are asked to participate in discussions and feel that their opinions, input and suggestions are seriously considered. In addition to the potential of creating an entirely new way of marketing, service or product line or candidate attraction programme, a brainstorming idea will also lead to more engaged employees and a happier and more productive workplace.

 

 

Tags:  APSO  apsogram  budget  creativity  deadlines  innovation  thinking 

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HR Future Lite Complimentary October 2014 Issue

Posted By APSO, 07 October 2014
Updated: 02 October 2014

HR Future Lite Complimentary October 2014 Issue

 

Herewith the complimentary digital edition of the October issue of “HR Future LITE” 

 

To view the October 2014 issue of HR Future LITE, please CLICK HERE or on the cover below. To become an HR Future member and gain access to all the articles in the complete version in your own copies of HR Future (R950 ex VAT for 12 months), email Chantal at chantal@hrfuture.net.

 

Tags:  anagement  APSO  eadership  ge Management  R Standards Roll-out  rade Unions 

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9 Time Management Tips for Recruiters

Posted By APSO, 02 October 2014
Updated: 18 September 2014

9 Time Management Tips for Recruiters

 

Author: Gary Stauble is the Principal Consultant for The Recruiting Lab, a Coaching Company that assists Firm Owners and Solo Recruiters in generating more profit in less time. Visit his site for additional resources, www.therecruitinglab.com.

  • Practice Single Tasking:

Batch your activities into segments such as marketing calls, recruiting calls etc. Do one type of activity at a time. This type of organised execution is a hallmark of high production.

Is it easy? Not at first. But, if you train yourself to do nothing but execute one type of call (marketing, recruiting etc.) during a calling hour, you’ll get out many more calls each day.

  • Do not take incoming calls during a calling segment:

This takes discipline but will produce big results for you. Return calls after you finish each calling segment and after your planning session at 5pm. Exceptions would be for placement-sensitive issues only.

  • Ask yourself, "What’s the fastest way to a send out?" In real estate, there are three things you must keep in mind when buying a home: location, location, location.

In recruiting, there are three things that lead to placements: send outs, send outs, and send outs.

Send outs (your candidate interviewed by your client) are more important than search assignments. An average send out to placement ratio is 1 out of 7. So if you just focused on getting 15 send outs per month, with a 1 out of 7 ratio, you’d be making 2 placements per month. With an average fee size of R25 000, you’d be over R175 000 in production.

  • Do a little bit of each part of the business each day:

If you do some marketing, some recruiting, some sourcing, some closing each day, you’ll even out your production and sleep better at night. I heard this idea from Peter Leffkowitz when I started out as a recruiter and it’s made a huge impact in my ability to avoid the peaks and valleys of production.

  • Do the closest activity to a placement first:

What could be simpler than this? When planning your day simply prioritise what’s closest to revenue. Usually the money oriented tasks involve these things: scheduling send outs, debriefing with clients or candidates after an interview, reference checks, closing issues etc.

These tasks are the first thing you should do each day and take priority over any other task regardless of what you’ve got down on your planner. Top producers have a laser-like focus on what leads to revenue.


  • Plan each activity segment the night before:

You’ve heard this before but are you really doing it each day? I recommend planning for a full hour each day from 4-5pm. Hold all calls during your planning time.

  • Execute marketing calls each day:

I suggest making between 5-25 calls each day. The amount you make depends on how close you are to "full capacity".

Full capacity for most contingency people is 5-10 "A" level contingency searches. For retained or engaged assignments, usually 3-4 search assignments would be determined as full capacity.

Think of your marketing calls the way you think of brushing your teeth; not the most exciting part of your day but it definitely pays off in the end and is a good thing to do early in the day.

  • Print your plan:

Have a physical plan in front of you so you can cross things off. For most people, this will increase your investment in finishing your plan for the day as we are generally visual people and can execute what we “see” we need to do.

  • Create a daily template for what time you will do each activity:

You must have a set schedule template in order to plan. See my example below:

An example of a daily schedule:

08:30-09:30 AM- Priority calls (prep/ debrief/ references/ offers etc.)    

09:30-11:00 AM- Marketing calls               

11:00-12:00 PM- Interview candidates   

12:00-01:00 PM- Lunch

01:00-01:30 PM- Sourcing/ Name Gathering       

01:30-04:00 PM- Recruiting        

04:00-05:00 PM- Planning

 


Tags:  APSO  apsogram  tasks  templates  time management 

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