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Aimed at corporate employers, especially those who make use of recruitment and staffing companies. Great articles, advice and issues of general interest to HR managers and others involved in talent recruitment, selection and retention.

 

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How to Get Clients to Love to Pay Fees

Posted By APSO, Monday, 12 January 2015
Updated: Wednesday, 17 December 2014

Clients love to pay fees, at least they do when they feel they are getting a value that is greater or equal than what they’re paying. If you can show a client your value, then you’ll never have to lower your fees. Why should you? But everyone else is, you might respond, and they can hire people cheaper through a competitor that works at a lower fee. Perhaps. But if they work through a competitor, then they don’t get YOU. YOU are a very large part of the equation, more than you might even realize. YOU are the reason this business never has been and never will be a commodity. It is an intensely difficult profession and an intensely personal one.




This people placing business is indeed a people business. And your clients are making a decision about working with you based on a certain hierarchy.

1.    First, they are judging your competence. They want to know that you can do what you say you are going to do.

2.    Secondly, they are judging your character. In their minds you might be able to bring them a great candidate, but are you going to stand behind your replacement if something happens to the candidate during the time of the guarantee period? They want to know that you’re not going to turn into a flake when you get called on the carpet.

3.    And third, they want to know that they will enjoy working with you. Will they look forward to your call, or are they dreading hearing the sound of your voice? By understanding this hierarchy, hopefully you can resist the urge to drop your fee every time a client hints at wanting to get a fee reduction.

Here is a four step process to give you a competitive advantage when a prospective client evaluates and compares your search proposal to others:

  1. Demonstrate your competence in the initial sales phase. Talk to your prospective client with a high level of professionalism. When you say you are going to call back, call back. When you say you are going to send an email or a brochure, then send it out, and follow up to make sure they received it. From the very first time you make contact with a prospective client, you are being evaluated.
  2. Show specifically how you have helped others. Mention companies, names, and satisfied client responses. If your prospective client has a concern, honour and respect that concern, and give him or her an example of another satisfied client that had the same concern.
  3. Don’t spout off how your company is known for integrity and other wonderful things in the market. Blah blah blah. Who cares about your company’s reputation? If your company has a reputation in the industry then the last thing you need to do is bring it up. If you have one, then you don’t need to mention it. If you don’t, then you’re either new, or you’ve got a lot of work ahead of you, or there might be some reason why you have not yet become the talk of the industry. Your client is concerned with you personally and those people who are going to be involved in doing the search work, more so than your company’s values. Tell the client what your personal values are as it relates to business, and why your values are important to you as a person. Remember that this search business is an intensely personal business, and you need to develop that sort of a strong rapport with your prospect.
  4. Your client will either hire you or someone else. You have no control over the decision that he makes. All you can do is put the odds in your favour. Sometimes the best thing to do once you have presented your case is to say "Call me if I can help." Forget about selling and selling and selling it. If you can show that you can meet their needs, and do it with a style that feels good to the client, then you don't need to keep selling them on how wonderful you are.

By showing your core competency to the client as a way that can provide value, you are well on your way to winning more business, keeping your fees high, and your margins healthy.

Author: Scott Love is a wacky management consultant who improves company profit margins by improving the sales performance of his clients. www.recruitingmastery.com

Tags:  APSO  APSOgram  business  character  clients  competency  competition  fees  value 

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Picking your Recruitment Partner

Posted By APSO, Wednesday, 12 February 2014
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Choosing a TES provider

Posted By APSO, Thursday, 06 June 2013
Updated: Thursday, 06 June 2013

With the current uncertainty around the temporary employment services (TES) regulations, many companies are worried about engaging new TES suppliers or beginning new contracts. And because of the joint and several liability risks that already exist under current legislation, this is a critical decision that businesses should not make lightly.

So how do you know who to choose?

At present there are low or no barriers to entry and this means that companies may find themselves dealing with an operator that is inexperienced or incapable of delivering a compliant service. To mitigate risk, we recommend that companies choose only to deal with TES providers who belong to a recognised professional body, such as the Federation of African Professional Staffing Organisations (APSO), where they are required to meet minimum compliance standards and subscribe to a code of ethics and best practice.

APSO membership hinges on compliance of the TES in terms of statutory regulations and meeting minimum operational standards to protect clients, work seekers and the image of the industry as a whole. For more specific detail on the exact compliance requirements, please visit www.apso.co.za

What questions should you ask?

Whether you choose to work with a company that belongs to a professional body or not, there are a few questions that you should ask every TES provider who you intend to work with including:

  1. Are they registered with the Department of Labour and in possession of a Private Employment Agencies (PEA) certificate?
  2. Are they registered, and in good standing, with SARS in terms of tax, VAT, PAYE, UIF, SDL and other employee deductions?
  3. If you work within a regulated sector, is the TES provider registered, and in good standing, with the applicable Bargaining Council and are their employee contracts and operations compliant with the collective agreements?
  4. Do they have sound internal policies and procedures to ensure fair labour relations practices and have they clearly explained the expectations of your role in the triangular employment relationship?
  5. Are there sufficient resources to ensure that TES employees are paid regularly, on the agreed dates, and that all associated employee administration is managed in accordance with legislation?

Choosing to work with an APSO member agency will provide you with comfort that the agency has undergone the compliance checks and is held accountable to the APSO Code of Ethical & Professional Practice. In the event of a dispute with the member agency, the company can lodge a complaint with APSO and have the matter resolved at no cost. For more information on the benefits of working with an APSO member agency, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 011 615 9417.

Tags:  APSO  compliance  Department of Labour  employee  fees  joint & several liability  preferred supplier listing  risk  SARS  statutory costs  temp  TES 

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